How Do We Know What Books Should Be in the Bible?

The early church recognized the “stamp of divine inspiration” early on. The main attributes that caused these early church leaders to recognize the writings to be divine and, therefore, necessary for inclusion into the canon were apostolicity, orthodoxy, antiquity, and ecclesiastical usage. (more…)

The Bible: All or Nothing

John N. Oswalt asserts that the theological reliability of the Bible depends, in part, on its historical reliability. Oswalt assumes an all-or-nothing approach in determining the Bible’s trustworthiness. Oswalt’s approach seems appropriate for two reasons. First, when an account has been proven to be inaccurate in one area, it follows that the accuracy of the other accounts ought to be called into question. Second, the Bible itself allows no room for partial accuracy. The Bible’s authors explicitly state that its source is divine in nature.

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The Name of God

tetragrammaton

The tetragrammaton in Hebrew.

Jehovah’s Witnesses stress the importance of using God’s proper name, Jehovah, when referring to the Heavenly Father. The name ‘Jehovah’ is actually one of the transliterations used when referring to the Hebrew word used for God, YHWH. The other commonly used transliteration is the name ‘Yahweh.’ Jews often used the word Adonai (translated ‘Lord’) in place of YHWH (also referred to as the tetragrammaton) out of fear and reverence to God. Most English translations of the Bible use the word ‘LORD’ (all caps) in place of YHWH. Although, some versions (such as the King James Version) use the name ‘Jehovah’ in select passages. An example of this is found in the book of Psalms: (more…)